Rider stories

Features from the field

Inspired by mom

“My mom is an avid cyclist in Ontario and growing up I always thought the spandex and cycling jargon was weird. I mean who Sarah and her mom riding RBC GranFondo Whistlerwants to spend their weekend riding 100+ km?? “They must be crazy” I thought.

“Over the years, I grew an understanding about the sport, what it means to be a cyclist and how strong my mom really is. As most people know, female riders are less common to run into. Not only was my mom one of them, but she kicked the guy’s butts. After chatting with some of the members from her cycling club I quickly learned my mom was an absolute inspiration.

“Even though I moved to Vancouver 2 years ago, cycling has brought my mom and I closer than ever. Talking on the phone for hours on end about what techniques she uses or what type of food I should be eating pre, post and during my rides was a common weekly activity.

“Before I knew it I started to form a small bike community of my own in Vancouver and I’ve never looked back. Cycling is part of my life and it always will be thanks to my mom.

“Mom decided to come out to ride the RBC GranFondo Whistler 2018 with a few of her cycling club members (some of them 70+ years old). When I heard this I had to sign up. Riding the most iconic road in BC with my mom was something I’ve always wanted to do.

“The gruelling 5 hour ride was one of the most memorable days of my life. I knew I wasn’t as strong as my mom, but she encouraged me pedal after pedal. From jamming out to music on my speakers to eyeing up bacon in Squamish (if you did the ride, you know what I’m talking about), or simply putting our heads down and ripping up the Alice Lake hill, this was a ride for the books.

“I can’t put into words how much it meant to cross the finish line with my mom by my side wearing her cycling club’s jersey. Cheers to many more rides, the sweat down our faces and the laughs that come with stories on the road! Love ya mom!!” – Sarah

Sarah and her mom completed the RBC GranFondo Whistler 2018 together.

 

More stories

Danny: A ride for the family

The new Medio 55km – A family challenge

“When we heard about the new Medio route at RBC GranFondo Whistler we decided that it will be the perfect challenging distance for us to ride as a family. The boys are 16 and 12, they started road cycling in the summer as a cross training for Biathlon.

“Cycling is the only sport that I (the old man) am still able to keep up with the boys too. We are very excited to do this family challenge!” – Danny

Danny and his two boys are riding the new Medio 55km Whistler based route in 2018.

Medio 55km

 

Overcoming open heart surgery: meet Marian

Marian’s story

Marian completed RBC GranFondo Whistler 2017 in an amazing time, beating hundreds of riders up the hillclimb

Marian riding in RBC GranFondo Whistler 2017

“Well, it’s two nights before the big day. I never believed this was possible. My story may not be that unusual but I am proud to be realizing a personal challenge and am almost there. I am 62 years old and in the past year, retired from my 38-year teaching career and completed my doctoral studies at SFU. On top of that, one year ago I had open heart surgery to correct an aortic aneurysm.

“This had been monitored for about 10 years after the sudden deaths of my brother and my father. Coroner and autopsy information suggested that their deaths were related to heart rhythm issues, which was followed by the recommendation that my 10 remaining siblings and I be tested and screened for cardiac issues. Of all of us, I was the only one who displayed the unusual heart rhythm. This led to the discovery of my aortic aneurysm.

“The ensuing years have been a time of well-followed intervention by my heart rhythm and aortic cardiac teams. Although nervous, I continued to grit my teeth and to stay fit, cycle moderately, and generally stay active, all the while knowing that I could have some kind of unpredictable cardiac event. After surgery, It took three months to be close to my normal “old” self, and 5 months to where I seem to have gone back in time, literally feeling the energy of a 20-year-old.

“During the past 4 years my family has been involved in the RBC GranFondo several times. For one of my four sons and my husband, this will be their third ride. For another son, his second. For me, my first. My only nerves relate to getting out of the marshaling area and managing clip-in shoes/pedals at the start.

“As far as the ride is concerned, I am excited. I received a new road bike for my spring birthday and my husband has been an overly tolerant and encouraging coach. We have spent the summer on the Sunshine Coast where we live, creating road circuits, riding up the coast to Pender Harbour and throughout the rest of the area. I have learned to be brave and endure areas of no shoulders, bad pavement, and the odd close vehicle encounter.

“I am loving the hills and at this point feel fit and ready. I am doing this ride to honour everyone who has been in my court over the past few years, particularly my family and wonderful cardiac team.

“Nothing feels as good as being on a bike, with the breeze in your face, and the road under your pedals.”

On September 9, 2017, Marian completed RBC GranFondo Whistler in a time of 8:15:37. On the KOM/QOM hillclimb competition, she rode faster than 284 other participants.

Forte winner Anneleen Bosma: "I'd never ridden a mountain before!"
Forte 2017 Women's Winner Anneleen Bosma

Anneleen at the startline in Stanley Park, Vancouver.

The Forte is the toughest category at RBC GranFondo Whistler, with 3100m of climibing and 152km distance. We sat down with Anneleen Bosma, of London, UK, to discuss her victorious 1st place in the Women’s 2017 Forte and see how she prepared:

This was your first time riding RBC GranFondo Whistler. What had you heard about and what attracted you to enter the Forte category?

I visited Vancouver a couple of years ago and rode with someone that was training for the Gran Fondo. It’s such a beautiful route! I entered the Forte category as I love to challenge myself and I having never climbed a mountain before, this was the perfect challenge for me.

What were your experiences in riding as an overseas athlete?

I had a great experience! I met some really lovely people at the start line and rode most of the route with a really great guy called Sean, who actually supported people on their journey to their First Fondo via the GranFondo Whistler clinics. The event was very well organized and I really enjoyed the burger at the finish line!

 

You ride with Rapha Cycling Club. How did you go about training for the ride?

I joined Rapha Cycling Club early July, which has been life-changing. Riding with friends is so much more fun, a great motivation to get up early to train and really helps you push yourself to get stronger.

I mainly trained by doing longer (hilly) rides on the weekend, weekly race training (sprintervals!) and I started racing crits three weeks before the Gran Fondo. In the months running up to the Gran Fondo I did several sportives, all quite long distances (160-305k) and very hilly (3500-4600m climbing).

What was your strategy for pacing, nutrition and the ride in general? How does the Forte rank in your spectrum of riding achievements?

I arrived in Vancouver three days before the Gran Fondo and as I had never climbed a mountain before, I went up Cypress Mountain on the Thursday to check it out and see what pace I could maintain on such a long climb.

On the day, I tried to ride in a group up to Cypress Mountain, but decided to stick to my own pace on the climb to prevent burning out too quickly. Halfway through I started passing people that passed me earlier so I knew that my strategy was working. When I got to the top of Cypress, I realized that I hadn’t seen any women descending yet so that motivated me to just push at my max pace for the rest of the ride.

I tend to find it quite difficult to eat well during a ride (gels and bars make me feel nauseous) so I try to consume about 400 calories/hour by drinking sports drinks and by eating Haribo!

The Forte ranks as one of my highest riding achievements, up there with getting my to Category 2 race license 6 weeks after I started racing!

What would you say to someone who was thinking about whether to enter the event?

If you’re thinking about it, just do it. Join a cycling club to train as it’s much more fun to train with friends than on your own, and when the big day comes, enjoy the ride and the incredible scenery!

 

Dan: From health scares to cycling a Gran Fondo in 2018

Dan’s journey

Dan is riding his first Gran Fondo, taking on the Forte 152km

“Every year I would say to myself and my wife – “this year I will get a bike and get into shape.  But alas…it never happened.”

It’s a story that many of us can associate with. But out of the blue, life threw Dan and his family a curveball.

“For years I have been making false-starts at returning to fitness. I now sit heavier than I have in decades, and it is not working out very well. My kidneys are not healthy, my energy levels are low and its downright embarrassing. I have a great career, one that I love so far, but lately it has come with a extra hours, travelling and stress. I am tired and can pull from hundreds of excuses.

We could lose her

My wife of 15 years, the sweet gorgeous hottie who is my best friend, and an absolute “must have” in my life, got very ill too.  It was frightening kind. Not the easy “she has a cold, she needs orange juice” kind of ill. It was the “we could lose her” type. That kind of worry for me and my kids really got me thinking. I thought about several scenarios that don’t end up well.

Then, text from 3 of my friends from High School came in from nowhere: “We signed up for the GranFondo Whistler…get a bike, stop being fat, and stop being a chicken”.

I am doing this

“Done. Sold.  I had a bike within the week and signed up for the ride and the clinic.  Never mind that it is 122km, a total elevation of 1900m, and that I get very tired driving the route in my car. I am doing this, and on an actual bike.

“Its hard being my size going into bike stores looking for kit.  Apparently my lovely little, hardly used, hybrid bike wouldn’t work, I need a decent road bike and kit.  So I asked my cyclist friends to translate the language of “cycle-ese” into plain English.

Advice and encouragement

“Plenty of help was available. The good news is that when they have my size, its often available in older models which can be heavily discounted.

“I Got a Specialized Roubaix SL4 Expert (Carbon & Ultegra) from Dunbar Cycles on Broadway, so now I cannot blame my kit. The price and service were great.  No one laughed at me, and in fact they gave me a lot of advice and encouragement.

Sir Mix a Lot

“I then bought the pedals, accessories and clothing.  The clothing included a jersey and bib shorts.  Moments before trying the clothing on I almost quit.  My mind raced: I don’t do spandex or lycra.  I lift weights, I do judo, I drink beer, I have a bit of a gut and already own huge legs. Sir Mix a Lot once performed a song in praise of my calibre of backside.  My wife noticed the fear so came into the change room.  Fortunately, it looked only bad enough to motivate me.  Not bad enough to have me quit.

“Finally I got to worrying about the inevitability of riding the trek alone. My friends are all about a foot shorter and over 100lbs lighter. The way up the mountain has a lot of up-hill action. So I figure that I would make friends fast during the training and the ride itself. This group seems to be a positive, supportive horde. The riders generally strike me as being a community that is there for each other, with encouragement, tools, advice and banter (something I respond very well to!)

“These parts of the journey, that have scared me so far, will likely pale in comparison to the actual struggles of the day, and the struggles of training. That last major climb before Whistler, the one I get tired driving up, will beat me far worse than my insecurities over my weight. Oddly, that feeling one gets when they face these challenges and feel those inner personal victories, is something I crave.”

Adapted from “The call to challenge, the call to change“, Bike vs Mountain blog.

 

Elizabeth: Thanks to my dad, I have a renewed sense of joy in my life

Elizabeth’s story

“My dad is a pretty fit guy (always has been) and he never seems to stop moving; he is always working on his vintage sports car or drafting the plans for a new renovation to the house. He has always been fairly athletic, but he really tested that athleticism by completing his first Whistler GranFondo the day that he turned 50 years old.

“At the time that dad completed his first Fondo, there was no possible way that I could comprehend the amount of mental and physical strength and willpower that it took for him to complete that task. I was morbidly obese, stressed out of my mind in a toxic relationship, I was suffering from an unstable mental health disorder, I had zero motivation to exercise or to make any healthy decisions and I was incredibly unhappy with the direction that my life had taken. This was all very evident to my dad and he worked very hard to set a positive example for me and to encourage me regularly to start taking control of my health. His persistence eventually paid off and I was able to slowly turn my life in a direction that encompassed healthy living.

“On the week of dad’s 55th birthday, he rode his third Whistler GranFondo and I wanted to see him cross the finish line ever so badly. My mom and I stayed in Whistler Village the night before the race and we woke up early to stake our place along the fence to cheer for the cyclists crossing the finish line. I will never forget seeing the look my dad’s face when our eyes met moments before he crossed the line: I felt electricity run through my body, and I immediately new that the Fondo was something that I needed to experience from the saddle of my own road bike.

“My dad did everything in his power to support my dream and my training the coming year. We started swimming olympic lengths together during the winter and I also started cycle training on an indoor trainer for the first time.

“In the early summer 2016, we set two endurance tests for ourselves that we would have to complete together before we registered for the Fondo: ride from Kitsilano to White Rock/Crescent Beach and back (122km) and to cycle up Cypress Mountain. Both endurance tests were THE most difficult challenges that I have ever put my mind and body through. However, were able to complete both tasks by mid August, so that meant that the 2016 Whistler GranFondo was a “go”!

“I was a nervous wreck the morning of the Fondo, to say the least! The amount of adrenaline running through my body was astronomical and it only increased when we crossed the start line in Stanley Park. I was terrified to cycle up Taylor Way for the first time, but little did I know that this tiny little steep climb was only a drop in the bucket compared to the Britannia Beach and Fury Creek climbs!

Read Liz's story of achievement against the odds

Liz celebrates with her dad after finishing the Fondo in 2017

“Throughout our 8 hour ride, regardless of how fast or slow I was cycling, my dad was either by my side or faithfully at the top of the hill waiting for me with a huge smile on his face or a hug for encouragement when I was feeling low.

“My dad and I were two of the very last people to cross the finish line in Whistler Village that day, but the important part is that we FINISHED! Words can’t describe the sense of accomplishment that I felt when I saw my mom cheering me on at the finish line, and with my dad’s hand on my shoulder as I wept tears of exhaustion and happiness all at the same time. I never could have imagined completing such a physically or mentally challenging feat without my dad’s steady encouragement, patience, understanding, sense of humour, time, energy and hugs while I cried tears of joy in celebration of my victories.

“With his influence in my life, I am now in a solid routine of exercising 3-5 days a week, I have lost 85 pounds and my weight continues to drop, my mental health disorder is stable and manageable, I choose to eat healthy and well balanced meals, I have a solid sense of self confidence and I have a renewed sense of joy in my life.

“I will never give up on training to become the best version of myself, and I have my dad and the Whistler GranFondo to thank for that.”

 

In 2017, Liz and her dad rode together again and took 90 minutes off their 2016 finishing time. In 2018, they’re aiming to shave off another hour.

Rick: Do it for the DNF

“My name is Rick Rumohr, 59. I have ridden the RBC GranFondo Whistler three times now, and loved every minute of it! But this is not about me, it is about my best buddy Dale Carleton, 58 years young.

“In 2012 Dale and I decided to tackle the Fondo, and even though Dale had been going through some health problems at the time, he wanted to give it a try. On the day Dale did not finish, but made it way farther than I ever expected him to. The thing that bothered him the most was the DNF – ‘Did Not Finish’ – after his name, which I could tell did not sit well with him.

Determined

“Fast forward to 2016, my wife Laura and I and Dale and his wife Sandy were vacationing in Whistler and made a pact to return in 2017 and compete in the Fondo. Dale trained hard and with the support of his family and friends he was determined to remove the DNF following his name.

“Race day came and we were all very excited to get going! There was 5 in our group, and in no time we quickly spread out all striving to get to the finish line. Four of us completed the race and headed off to the hotel for a change of clothes, returning quickly to the finish line to cheer on our buddy Dale.

Tough times

“Dale was having a tough time on the course. He’d run over a stray water bottle in an accident and come off his bike, requiring a trip to the medical tent thanks to his scuffed jersey and dented helmet. Despite all this, Dale however just wanted to complete the race. He said the medical staff were great, and on his behalf I would like to say a big thank you to all of them!

“His bike was in rough shape but the great roadside mechanics were able to straighten things out and make it rideable again! Again, a big thank you to all the volunteers; what you do is greatly appreciated!

UnforgettableDale about to cross the finish line successfully in 2017

“Well Dale got back on his bike and at about the eight and a half hour mark he came around the corner and they announced his name, sending our group at the finish line into a big group hug jumping up and down and cheering for Dale as he crossed the finish line. It is something I will always remember!

“Dale is a true testament to the perseverance of life! Good on ya Dale – we are all very proud of you – plus you no longer have that DNF after your name!”

 

 

 

 

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